Inspiration
Things I Really Love
Inspiration
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bathroom
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brazilwonders:

Ipê amarelo - Campinas, São Paulo (by cirowsky)
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Delicious sweets at Paris’s @Plaza_Athenee by pastry chef @Christophe_Michalak. #dispatchfrom senior photo editor @leonorjr! #paris #travelereats #pastries
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Unlikely Symbiosis: Coalmines and SANAA’s Zollverein School
Japanese architecture firm SANAA, led by Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, designed the first building to be constructed for the new Rem Koolhaas/OMA masterplan on the historic Zeche Zollverein coal mine site. Declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2001, the Zeche Zollverein, located just outside Essen, Germany, is a monumental array of mine heads, coking plants and coal-washing units scattered over an area of several hundred acres. As the vein of coal expired, the site was gradually decommissioned in the mid-80s. Spurred by the renewed international interest in the site, however, the city of Essen laid out plans to transform the Zeche Zollverein into a primary pole for design, architecture and art within Europe. SANAA’s Zollverein School of Management and Design, a bright white, perforate cube, stands out in stark contrast to its surroundings. But its design is not simply aesthetic: its ultra-thin concrete walls were made possible by pumping warm water from nearby operative coal mines through the facade, doing away with the need for thick insulation. The innovation allowed for the recycling of abundant, naturally heated wastewater from mines and drove the overall cost, both in terms of implementation and day-to-day use, lower than if conventional insulation had been used.

Unlikely Symbiosis: Coalmines and SANAA’s Zollverein School
Japanese architecture firm SANAA, led by Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, designed the first building to be constructed for the new Rem Koolhaas/OMA masterplan on the historic Zeche Zollverein coal mine site. Declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2001, the Zeche Zollverein, located just outside Essen, Germany, is a monumental array of mine heads, coking plants and coal-washing units scattered over an area of several hundred acres. As the vein of coal expired, the site was gradually decommissioned in the mid-80s. Spurred by the renewed international interest in the site, however, the city of Essen laid out plans to transform the Zeche Zollverein into a primary pole for design, architecture and art within Europe. SANAA’s Zollverein School of Management and Design, a bright white, perforate cube, stands out in stark contrast to its surroundings. But its design is not simply aesthetic: its ultra-thin concrete walls were made possible by pumping warm water from nearby operative coal mines through the facade, doing away with the need for thick insulation. The innovation allowed for the recycling of abundant, naturally heated wastewater from mines and drove the overall cost, both in terms of implementation and day-to-day use, lower than if conventional insulation had been used.

Unlikely Symbiosis: Coalmines and SANAA’s Zollverein School
Japanese architecture firm SANAA, led by Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, designed the first building to be constructed for the new Rem Koolhaas/OMA masterplan on the historic Zeche Zollverein coal mine site. Declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2001, the Zeche Zollverein, located just outside Essen, Germany, is a monumental array of mine heads, coking plants and coal-washing units scattered over an area of several hundred acres. As the vein of coal expired, the site was gradually decommissioned in the mid-80s. Spurred by the renewed international interest in the site, however, the city of Essen laid out plans to transform the Zeche Zollverein into a primary pole for design, architecture and art within Europe. SANAA’s Zollverein School of Management and Design, a bright white, perforate cube, stands out in stark contrast to its surroundings. But its design is not simply aesthetic: its ultra-thin concrete walls were made possible by pumping warm water from nearby operative coal mines through the facade, doing away with the need for thick insulation. The innovation allowed for the recycling of abundant, naturally heated wastewater from mines and drove the overall cost, both in terms of implementation and day-to-day use, lower than if conventional insulation had been used.
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earth
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African violet - one of my favorites…
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shickbuttt:

I love them.
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artist:Swoon
artist:Swoon
artist:Swoon
artist:Swoon
artist:Swoon
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beautiful