Inspiration
Things I Really Love
Inspiration
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Amor
Love
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“A Arte Bonita Da Rua de Brasil” 
Apolo Torres

“A Arte Bonita Da Rua de Brasil” 
Apolo Torres

“A Arte Bonita Da Rua de Brasil” 
Apolo Torres

“A Arte Bonita Da Rua de Brasil” 
Apolo Torres
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ALEXANDRE  FARTE
Portuguese artist Alexandre Farto (1987) has been interacting visually with the urban environment under the name of Vhils since his days as a prolific graffiti writer in the early 2000s.His groundbreaking carving technique – which forms the basis of the Scratching the Surface series and was first presented to the public at the VSP group show in Lisbon in 2007 and at the Cans Festival in London in 2008 –, has been hailed as one of the most compelling approaches to art created in the street in the last decade.This striking form of visual poetry, showcased around the world in both indoor and outdoor settings, has been described as brutal and complex, yet imbued with a simplicity that speaks to the core of human emotions, expressing the struggle between the aspirations of the individual and the demanding, saturated environment of the urban spaces he lives in, highlighting and exposing the sombre dimension that lies behind the current model of development and the material aspirations it encompasses – unsustainable, yet inebriating.Vhils grew up in Seixal, an industrialised suburb across the river from Lisbon, the capital of Portugal and was particularly influenced by the transformations brought on by the intensive urban development the country underwent in the 1980s and 1990s.An avid experimentalist, he has been developing his notion of the aesthetics of vandalism in a plurality of media – from stencil painting to wall carving, from pyrotechnic explosions to 3D modelling – which have enabled him to expand the boundaries of visual expression.His unique approach and artwork have been garnering critical acclaim around the world.

ALEXANDRE  FARTE
Portuguese artist Alexandre Farto (1987) has been interacting visually with the urban environment under the name of Vhils since his days as a prolific graffiti writer in the early 2000s.His groundbreaking carving technique – which forms the basis of the Scratching the Surface series and was first presented to the public at the VSP group show in Lisbon in 2007 and at the Cans Festival in London in 2008 –, has been hailed as one of the most compelling approaches to art created in the street in the last decade.This striking form of visual poetry, showcased around the world in both indoor and outdoor settings, has been described as brutal and complex, yet imbued with a simplicity that speaks to the core of human emotions, expressing the struggle between the aspirations of the individual and the demanding, saturated environment of the urban spaces he lives in, highlighting and exposing the sombre dimension that lies behind the current model of development and the material aspirations it encompasses – unsustainable, yet inebriating.Vhils grew up in Seixal, an industrialised suburb across the river from Lisbon, the capital of Portugal and was particularly influenced by the transformations brought on by the intensive urban development the country underwent in the 1980s and 1990s.An avid experimentalist, he has been developing his notion of the aesthetics of vandalism in a plurality of media – from stencil painting to wall carving, from pyrotechnic explosions to 3D modelling – which have enabled him to expand the boundaries of visual expression.His unique approach and artwork have been garnering critical acclaim around the world.

ALEXANDRE  FARTE
Portuguese artist Alexandre Farto (1987) has been interacting visually with the urban environment under the name of Vhils since his days as a prolific graffiti writer in the early 2000s.His groundbreaking carving technique – which forms the basis of the Scratching the Surface series and was first presented to the public at the VSP group show in Lisbon in 2007 and at the Cans Festival in London in 2008 –, has been hailed as one of the most compelling approaches to art created in the street in the last decade.This striking form of visual poetry, showcased around the world in both indoor and outdoor settings, has been described as brutal and complex, yet imbued with a simplicity that speaks to the core of human emotions, expressing the struggle between the aspirations of the individual and the demanding, saturated environment of the urban spaces he lives in, highlighting and exposing the sombre dimension that lies behind the current model of development and the material aspirations it encompasses – unsustainable, yet inebriating.Vhils grew up in Seixal, an industrialised suburb across the river from Lisbon, the capital of Portugal and was particularly influenced by the transformations brought on by the intensive urban development the country underwent in the 1980s and 1990s.An avid experimentalist, he has been developing his notion of the aesthetics of vandalism in a plurality of media – from stencil painting to wall carving, from pyrotechnic explosions to 3D modelling – which have enabled him to expand the boundaries of visual expression.His unique approach and artwork have been garnering critical acclaim around the world.

ALEXANDRE  FARTE
Portuguese artist Alexandre Farto (1987) has been interacting visually with the urban environment under the name of Vhils since his days as a prolific graffiti writer in the early 2000s.His groundbreaking carving technique – which forms the basis of the Scratching the Surface series and was first presented to the public at the VSP group show in Lisbon in 2007 and at the Cans Festival in London in 2008 –, has been hailed as one of the most compelling approaches to art created in the street in the last decade.This striking form of visual poetry, showcased around the world in both indoor and outdoor settings, has been described as brutal and complex, yet imbued with a simplicity that speaks to the core of human emotions, expressing the struggle between the aspirations of the individual and the demanding, saturated environment of the urban spaces he lives in, highlighting and exposing the sombre dimension that lies behind the current model of development and the material aspirations it encompasses – unsustainable, yet inebriating.Vhils grew up in Seixal, an industrialised suburb across the river from Lisbon, the capital of Portugal and was particularly influenced by the transformations brought on by the intensive urban development the country underwent in the 1980s and 1990s.An avid experimentalist, he has been developing his notion of the aesthetics of vandalism in a plurality of media – from stencil painting to wall carving, from pyrotechnic explosions to 3D modelling – which have enabled him to expand the boundaries of visual expression.His unique approach and artwork have been garnering critical acclaim around the world.

ALEXANDRE  FARTE
Portuguese artist Alexandre Farto (1987) has been interacting visually with the urban environment under the name of Vhils since his days as a prolific graffiti writer in the early 2000s.His groundbreaking carving technique – which forms the basis of the Scratching the Surface series and was first presented to the public at the VSP group show in Lisbon in 2007 and at the Cans Festival in London in 2008 –, has been hailed as one of the most compelling approaches to art created in the street in the last decade.This striking form of visual poetry, showcased around the world in both indoor and outdoor settings, has been described as brutal and complex, yet imbued with a simplicity that speaks to the core of human emotions, expressing the struggle between the aspirations of the individual and the demanding, saturated environment of the urban spaces he lives in, highlighting and exposing the sombre dimension that lies behind the current model of development and the material aspirations it encompasses – unsustainable, yet inebriating.Vhils grew up in Seixal, an industrialised suburb across the river from Lisbon, the capital of Portugal and was particularly influenced by the transformations brought on by the intensive urban development the country underwent in the 1980s and 1990s.An avid experimentalist, he has been developing his notion of the aesthetics of vandalism in a plurality of media – from stencil painting to wall carving, from pyrotechnic explosions to 3D modelling – which have enabled him to expand the boundaries of visual expression.His unique approach and artwork have been garnering critical acclaim around the world.

ALEXANDRE  FARTE
Portuguese artist Alexandre Farto (1987) has been interacting visually with the urban environment under the name of Vhils since his days as a prolific graffiti writer in the early 2000s.His groundbreaking carving technique – which forms the basis of the Scratching the Surface series and was first presented to the public at the VSP group show in Lisbon in 2007 and at the Cans Festival in London in 2008 –, has been hailed as one of the most compelling approaches to art created in the street in the last decade.This striking form of visual poetry, showcased around the world in both indoor and outdoor settings, has been described as brutal and complex, yet imbued with a simplicity that speaks to the core of human emotions, expressing the struggle between the aspirations of the individual and the demanding, saturated environment of the urban spaces he lives in, highlighting and exposing the sombre dimension that lies behind the current model of development and the material aspirations it encompasses – unsustainable, yet inebriating.Vhils grew up in Seixal, an industrialised suburb across the river from Lisbon, the capital of Portugal and was particularly influenced by the transformations brought on by the intensive urban development the country underwent in the 1980s and 1990s.An avid experimentalist, he has been developing his notion of the aesthetics of vandalism in a plurality of media – from stencil painting to wall carving, from pyrotechnic explosions to 3D modelling – which have enabled him to expand the boundaries of visual expression.His unique approach and artwork have been garnering critical acclaim around the world.

ALEXANDRE  FARTE
Portuguese artist Alexandre Farto (1987) has been interacting visually with the urban environment under the name of Vhils since his days as a prolific graffiti writer in the early 2000s.His groundbreaking carving technique – which forms the basis of the Scratching the Surface series and was first presented to the public at the VSP group show in Lisbon in 2007 and at the Cans Festival in London in 2008 –, has been hailed as one of the most compelling approaches to art created in the street in the last decade.This striking form of visual poetry, showcased around the world in both indoor and outdoor settings, has been described as brutal and complex, yet imbued with a simplicity that speaks to the core of human emotions, expressing the struggle between the aspirations of the individual and the demanding, saturated environment of the urban spaces he lives in, highlighting and exposing the sombre dimension that lies behind the current model of development and the material aspirations it encompasses – unsustainable, yet inebriating.Vhils grew up in Seixal, an industrialised suburb across the river from Lisbon, the capital of Portugal and was particularly influenced by the transformations brought on by the intensive urban development the country underwent in the 1980s and 1990s.An avid experimentalist, he has been developing his notion of the aesthetics of vandalism in a plurality of media – from stencil painting to wall carving, from pyrotechnic explosions to 3D modelling – which have enabled him to expand the boundaries of visual expression.His unique approach and artwork have been garnering critical acclaim around the world.

ALEXANDRE  FARTE
Portuguese artist Alexandre Farto (1987) has been interacting visually with the urban environment under the name of Vhils since his days as a prolific graffiti writer in the early 2000s.His groundbreaking carving technique – which forms the basis of the Scratching the Surface series and was first presented to the public at the VSP group show in Lisbon in 2007 and at the Cans Festival in London in 2008 –, has been hailed as one of the most compelling approaches to art created in the street in the last decade.This striking form of visual poetry, showcased around the world in both indoor and outdoor settings, has been described as brutal and complex, yet imbued with a simplicity that speaks to the core of human emotions, expressing the struggle between the aspirations of the individual and the demanding, saturated environment of the urban spaces he lives in, highlighting and exposing the sombre dimension that lies behind the current model of development and the material aspirations it encompasses – unsustainable, yet inebriating.Vhils grew up in Seixal, an industrialised suburb across the river from Lisbon, the capital of Portugal and was particularly influenced by the transformations brought on by the intensive urban development the country underwent in the 1980s and 1990s.An avid experimentalist, he has been developing his notion of the aesthetics of vandalism in a plurality of media – from stencil painting to wall carving, from pyrotechnic explosions to 3D modelling – which have enabled him to expand the boundaries of visual expression.His unique approach and artwork have been garnering critical acclaim around the world.

ALEXANDRE  FARTE
Portuguese artist Alexandre Farto (1987) has been interacting visually with the urban environment under the name of Vhils since his days as a prolific graffiti writer in the early 2000s.His groundbreaking carving technique – which forms the basis of the Scratching the Surface series and was first presented to the public at the VSP group show in Lisbon in 2007 and at the Cans Festival in London in 2008 –, has been hailed as one of the most compelling approaches to art created in the street in the last decade.This striking form of visual poetry, showcased around the world in both indoor and outdoor settings, has been described as brutal and complex, yet imbued with a simplicity that speaks to the core of human emotions, expressing the struggle between the aspirations of the individual and the demanding, saturated environment of the urban spaces he lives in, highlighting and exposing the sombre dimension that lies behind the current model of development and the material aspirations it encompasses – unsustainable, yet inebriating.Vhils grew up in Seixal, an industrialised suburb across the river from Lisbon, the capital of Portugal and was particularly influenced by the transformations brought on by the intensive urban development the country underwent in the 1980s and 1990s.An avid experimentalist, he has been developing his notion of the aesthetics of vandalism in a plurality of media – from stencil painting to wall carving, from pyrotechnic explosions to 3D modelling – which have enabled him to expand the boundaries of visual expression.His unique approach and artwork have been garnering critical acclaim around the world.

ALEXANDRE  FARTE
Portuguese artist Alexandre Farto (1987) has been interacting visually with the urban environment under the name of Vhils since his days as a prolific graffiti writer in the early 2000s.His groundbreaking carving technique – which forms the basis of the Scratching the Surface series and was first presented to the public at the VSP group show in Lisbon in 2007 and at the Cans Festival in London in 2008 –, has been hailed as one of the most compelling approaches to art created in the street in the last decade.This striking form of visual poetry, showcased around the world in both indoor and outdoor settings, has been described as brutal and complex, yet imbued with a simplicity that speaks to the core of human emotions, expressing the struggle between the aspirations of the individual and the demanding, saturated environment of the urban spaces he lives in, highlighting and exposing the sombre dimension that lies behind the current model of development and the material aspirations it encompasses – unsustainable, yet inebriating.Vhils grew up in Seixal, an industrialised suburb across the river from Lisbon, the capital of Portugal and was particularly influenced by the transformations brought on by the intensive urban development the country underwent in the 1980s and 1990s.An avid experimentalist, he has been developing his notion of the aesthetics of vandalism in a plurality of media – from stencil painting to wall carving, from pyrotechnic explosions to 3D modelling – which have enabled him to expand the boundaries of visual expression.His unique approach and artwork have been garnering critical acclaim around the world.
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"Picasso" by  Anatol Knotek 
(from the written portraits series)

"Picasso" by  Anatol Knotek 
(from the written portraits series)

"Picasso" by  Anatol Knotek 
(from the written portraits series)
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Pieter Hugo

Pieter Hugo

Pieter Hugo

Pieter Hugo
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Doodle in Mid-Air
World’s Smallest 3D-Printing Pen Is Coming to Kickstarter
Humans are accustomed to drawing in the air. We gesture with our hands when talking and will try to illustrate charade secrets by “drawing” objects in space. 3D-printing pens takes those gestures, makes them tangible and, in the hands of an artists, beautiful. Recent 3D-printing pens have been cool, but clunky affairs. LIX Pen, however, is something different. It’s light, small and apparently needs no more power than you can draw from your run-of-the-mill laptop. Now it’s coming to Kickstarter.
Measuring 6.45 inches long, 0.55 inch in diameter and weighing just 1.23 ounces, the aluminum 3D-printing pen (which also comes in black) really is pen sized. You hold it just like a pen, and plug a 3.5mm-like jack into the base and the other end of your cable into your computer. The juice allows LIX to heat to over 300-degrees Fahrenheit, though the plant-based PLA filament (it can also use the stronger ABS plastic) only needs to heat to 180-degrees to work. That filament is fed in through a hole in the base and emerges as a super-heated liquid on the tip so you can start doodling in the air.
Plus Video
http://mashable.com/2014/04/10/worlds-smallest-3d-printing-pen-kickstarter/?utm_cid=mash-com-tu-photo

Doodle in Mid-Air
World’s Smallest 3D-Printing Pen Is Coming to Kickstarter
Humans are accustomed to drawing in the air. We gesture with our hands when talking and will try to illustrate charade secrets by “drawing” objects in space. 3D-printing pens takes those gestures, makes them tangible and, in the hands of an artists, beautiful. Recent 3D-printing pens have been cool, but clunky affairs. LIX Pen, however, is something different. It’s light, small and apparently needs no more power than you can draw from your run-of-the-mill laptop. Now it’s coming to Kickstarter.
Measuring 6.45 inches long, 0.55 inch in diameter and weighing just 1.23 ounces, the aluminum 3D-printing pen (which also comes in black) really is pen sized. You hold it just like a pen, and plug a 3.5mm-like jack into the base and the other end of your cable into your computer. The juice allows LIX to heat to over 300-degrees Fahrenheit, though the plant-based PLA filament (it can also use the stronger ABS plastic) only needs to heat to 180-degrees to work. That filament is fed in through a hole in the base and emerges as a super-heated liquid on the tip so you can start doodling in the air.
Plus Video
http://mashable.com/2014/04/10/worlds-smallest-3d-printing-pen-kickstarter/?utm_cid=mash-com-tu-photo

Doodle in Mid-Air
World’s Smallest 3D-Printing Pen Is Coming to Kickstarter
Humans are accustomed to drawing in the air. We gesture with our hands when talking and will try to illustrate charade secrets by “drawing” objects in space. 3D-printing pens takes those gestures, makes them tangible and, in the hands of an artists, beautiful. Recent 3D-printing pens have been cool, but clunky affairs. LIX Pen, however, is something different. It’s light, small and apparently needs no more power than you can draw from your run-of-the-mill laptop. Now it’s coming to Kickstarter.
Measuring 6.45 inches long, 0.55 inch in diameter and weighing just 1.23 ounces, the aluminum 3D-printing pen (which also comes in black) really is pen sized. You hold it just like a pen, and plug a 3.5mm-like jack into the base and the other end of your cable into your computer. The juice allows LIX to heat to over 300-degrees Fahrenheit, though the plant-based PLA filament (it can also use the stronger ABS plastic) only needs to heat to 180-degrees to work. That filament is fed in through a hole in the base and emerges as a super-heated liquid on the tip so you can start doodling in the air.
Plus Video
http://mashable.com/2014/04/10/worlds-smallest-3d-printing-pen-kickstarter/?utm_cid=mash-com-tu-photo
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Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman
Forget about Mona Lisa the 2D painting, Zaria Forman, a New York based artist, created these amazing 3D paintings by using waves of thick paint for the creation of water and icebergs. These paintings are based on Greenlands icebergs and mountains and she made them for her late mother.
In the first image you see Zaria working on creating the icebergs on a half finished canvas.

Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman
Forget about Mona Lisa the 2D painting, Zaria Forman, a New York based artist, created these amazing 3D paintings by using waves of thick paint for the creation of water and icebergs. These paintings are based on Greenlands icebergs and mountains and she made them for her late mother.
In the first image you see Zaria working on creating the icebergs on a half finished canvas.

Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman
Forget about Mona Lisa the 2D painting, Zaria Forman, a New York based artist, created these amazing 3D paintings by using waves of thick paint for the creation of water and icebergs. These paintings are based on Greenlands icebergs and mountains and she made them for her late mother.
In the first image you see Zaria working on creating the icebergs on a half finished canvas.

Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman
Forget about Mona Lisa the 2D painting, Zaria Forman, a New York based artist, created these amazing 3D paintings by using waves of thick paint for the creation of water and icebergs. These paintings are based on Greenlands icebergs and mountains and she made them for her late mother.
In the first image you see Zaria working on creating the icebergs on a half finished canvas.

Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman
Forget about Mona Lisa the 2D painting, Zaria Forman, a New York based artist, created these amazing 3D paintings by using waves of thick paint for the creation of water and icebergs. These paintings are based on Greenlands icebergs and mountains and she made them for her late mother.
In the first image you see Zaria working on creating the icebergs on a half finished canvas.

Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman
Forget about Mona Lisa the 2D painting, Zaria Forman, a New York based artist, created these amazing 3D paintings by using waves of thick paint for the creation of water and icebergs. These paintings are based on Greenlands icebergs and mountains and she made them for her late mother.
In the first image you see Zaria working on creating the icebergs on a half finished canvas.

Realistic Paintings Of Greenland Made By Zaria Forman
Forget about Mona Lisa the 2D painting, Zaria Forman, a New York based artist, created these amazing 3D paintings by using waves of thick paint for the creation of water and icebergs. These paintings are based on Greenlands icebergs and mountains and she made them for her late mother.
In the first image you see Zaria working on creating the icebergs on a half finished canvas.
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People of ColorBe proud for your own culture,  be proud for the color of your skin, be proud for who you are.Protect & respect your own beliefs, culture, traditions, origins, & morality because those are the ones that gives color and meaning to this world.

Feminine beauty all around the world <3


People of ColorBe proud for your own culture,  be proud for the color of your skin, be proud for who you are.Protect & respect your own beliefs, culture, traditions, origins, & morality because those are the ones that gives color and meaning to this world.

Feminine beauty all around the world <3


People of ColorBe proud for your own culture,  be proud for the color of your skin, be proud for who you are.Protect & respect your own beliefs, culture, traditions, origins, & morality because those are the ones that gives color and meaning to this world.

Feminine beauty all around the world <3


People of ColorBe proud for your own culture,  be proud for the color of your skin, be proud for who you are.Protect & respect your own beliefs, culture, traditions, origins, & morality because those are the ones that gives color and meaning to this world.

Feminine beauty all around the world <3


People of ColorBe proud for your own culture,  be proud for the color of your skin, be proud for who you are.Protect & respect your own beliefs, culture, traditions, origins, & morality because those are the ones that gives color and meaning to this world.

Feminine beauty all around the world <3


People of ColorBe proud for your own culture,  be proud for the color of your skin, be proud for who you are.Protect & respect your own beliefs, culture, traditions, origins, & morality because those are the ones that gives color and meaning to this world.

Feminine beauty all around the world <3


People of ColorBe proud for your own culture,  be proud for the color of your skin, be proud for who you are.Protect & respect your own beliefs, culture, traditions, origins, & morality because those are the ones that gives color and meaning to this world.

Feminine beauty all around the world <3


People of ColorBe proud for your own culture,  be proud for the color of your skin, be proud for who you are.Protect & respect your own beliefs, culture, traditions, origins, & morality because those are the ones that gives color and meaning to this world.

Feminine beauty all around the world <3


People of ColorBe proud for your own culture,  be proud for the color of your skin, be proud for who you are.Protect & respect your own beliefs, culture, traditions, origins, & morality because those are the ones that gives color and meaning to this world.

Feminine beauty all around the world <3


People of ColorBe proud for your own culture,  be proud for the color of your skin, be proud for who you are.Protect & respect your own beliefs, culture, traditions, origins, & morality because those are the ones that gives color and meaning to this world.

Feminine beauty all around the world <3
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Brasil
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